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Thursday, September 17, 2009

More Facts About Spratlys Island



The Spratly Islands are a group of more than 650 reefs, islets, atolls, cays and islands in the South China Sea between the Philippines, China, Malaysia and Vietnam. They comprise less than five square kilometers of land area, spread over more than 400,000 square kilometers of sea. The Spratlys, as they are called, are part of the three archipelagos of the South China Sea, comprising more than 30,000 islands and reefs and which so complicates geography, governance and economics in that region of Southeast Asia. Such small and remote islands have little economic value in themselves, but are important in establishing international boundaries. There are no native islanders but there are rich fishing grounds and initial surveys indicate the islands may contain significant oil and gas.
About 45 islands are occupied by relatively small numbers of military forces from the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

Geographic and economic overview

• Coordinates: 8°38′N 111°55′E8.633°N 111.917°ECoordinates: 8°38′N 111°55′E8.633°N 111.917°E (Spratly Island)
• Area (land): less than 5 km²
o note: includes 148 or so islets, coral reefs, and seamounts scattered over an area of nearly 410,000 km² of the central South China Sea
• Coastline: 926 km
Climate: tropical
Terrain: flat
Elevation extremes:
lowest point: South China Sea (0 m)
highest point: unnamed location on Southwest Cay (4 m)
Natural hazards: serious maritime hazards because of numerous banks, reefs and shoals

The islands are most likely volcanic in origin. The islands themselves contain almost no significant arable land and have no indigenous inhabitants, although twenty of the islands, including Itu Aba, the largest, are considered to be able to sustain human life. Natural resources include fish, guano, undetermined oil and natural gas potential. Economic activity includes commercial fishing, shipping, and tourism. The proximity to nearby oil- and gas-producing sedimentary basins suggests the potential for oil and gas deposits, but the region is largely unexplored, and there are no reliable estimates of potential reserves. Commercial exploitation of hydrocarbons has yet to be developed. The Spratly Islands have at least three fishing ports, several docks and harbors, at least three heliports, at least four territorial rigging style outposts (especially due west of Namyit), and six to eight airstrips. These islands are strategically located near several primary shipping lanes.


Ecology


Coral reefs
Coral reefs are the predominant structure of these islands; the Spratly group contains over 600 coral reefs in total.


Vegetation
Little vegetation grows on these islands, which are subject to intense monsoons. Larger islands are capable of supporting tropical forest, scrub forest, coastal scrub and grasses. It is difficult to determine which species have been introduced or cultivated by humans. Itu Aba Island was reportedly covered with shrubs, coconut, and mangroves in 1938; pineapple was also cultivated here when it was profitable. Other accounts mention papaya, banana, palm, and even white peach trees growing on one island. A few islands which have been developed as small tourist resorts have had soil and trees brought in and planted where there were none.


Wildlife

The islands that do have vegetation provide important habitats for many seabirds and sea turtles.
Both the Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas, endangered) and the Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata, critically endangered) formerly occurred in numbers sufficient to support commercial exploitation. These species reportedly continue to nest even on islands inhabited by military personnel (such as Pratas) to some extent, though it is believed that their numbers have declined.

Seabirds use the islands for resting, breeding, and wintering sites. Species found here include Streaked Shearwater (Calonectris Leucomelas), Brown Booby (Sula Leucogaster), Red-Footed Booby (S. sula), Great Crested Tern (Sterna bergii), and White Tern (Gygis Alba). Little information is available regarding current status of the islands’ seabird populations, though it is likely that birds may divert nesting site to smaller, less disturbed islands. Bird eggs cover the majority of Nan Tzu Chiao, a small island in the eastern Danger Zone.

Unfortunately, this ecoregion is still largely a mystery. Scientists have focused their research on the marine environment, while the ecology of the terrestrial environment remains relatively unknown.


Ecological hazards
Political instability, tourism and the increasing industrialization of neighboring countries has led to serious disruption of native flora and fauna, over-exploitation of natural resources, and environmental pollution. Disruption of nesting areas by human activity or by introduced animals, such as dogs, has reduced the number of turtles nesting on the islands. Sea turtles are also slaughtered for food on a significant scale. The sea turtle is a symbol of longevity in Chinese customs and at times the military personnel are given orders to protect the turtles.

Heavy commercial fishing in the region incurs other problems. Though it has been outlawed, fishing methods continue to include the use of bottom trawls fitted with chain rollers. In addition, during a recent routine patrol, more than 200 kg of KCn solution was confiscated from fishermen who had been using it for fish poisoning. These activities have a devastating impact on local marine organisms and coral reefs.

Some interest has been taken in regard to conservation of these island ecosystems. J.W. McManus has explored the possibilities of designating portions of the Spratly Islands as a marine park. One region of the Spratly Archipelago, called Truong Sa, was proposed by Vietnam’s Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment (MOSTE) as a future protected area. The 160 km2 site is currently managed by the Khanh Hoa Provincial People’s Committee of Vietnam.

Military groups in the Spratlys have engaged in environmentally damaging activities such as shooting turtles and seabirds, raiding nests, and fishing with explosives. The collection of rare medicinal plants, collecting of wood and hunting for the wildlife trade are common threats to the biodiversity of the entire region, including these islands. Coral habitats are threatened by pollution, over-exploitation of fish and invertebrates, and the use of explosives and poisons as fishing techniques.Spr

More Facts About Sabah, Borneo



Sabah is a Malaysian state located on the northern portion of the island of Borneo . It is the second largest state in Malaysia after Sarawak, which it borders on its south-west. It also shares a border with the province of East Kalimantan of Indonesia in the south. In spite of its status as a Malaysian state, Sabah remains a disputed territory; the Philippines has a dormant claim over much of the eastern part of the territory. The capital of Sabah is Kota Kinabalu, formerly known as Jesselton. Sabah is known as "Sabah, negeri di bawah bayu", which means "Sabah, the land below the winds", because of its location just south of the typhoon-prone region around the Philippines.

History

The region of present-day Sabah was part of the Sultanate of Brunei around the early 16th century. This was during the period when the Sultanate was at its 'golden era.' In 1658 the Sultan of Brunei ceded the northeast portion of Borneo to the Sultan of Sulu in compensation for the latter's help in settling a civil war in the Brunei Sultanate. In 1761 an officer of the British East India Company, Alexander Dalrymple, concluded an agreement with the Sultan of Sulu to allow him to set up a trading post in the region. This together with other attempts to build a settlement and a military station centering around Pulau Balambangan proved to be a failure. There was minimal foreign interest in this region afterward and control over most parts of north Borneo seems to have remained under the Sultanate of Brunei. In 1865 the American Consul of Brunei, Claude Lee Moses, obtained a 10-year lease over North Borneo from the Sultan of Brunei. Ownership was then passed to an American trading company owned by J.W. Torrey, T.B. Harris and some Chinese merchants. They set up a base and settlement in Kimanis but this too failed due to financial reasons. The rights of the trading company were then sold to Baron Von Overbeck, the Austrian Consul in Hong Kong, and he later obtained another 10-year renewal of the lease. The rights were subsequently transferred to Alfred Dent, whom in 1881 formed the British North Borneo Provisional Association Ltd. In the following year, the British North Borneo Company was formed and Kudat was made its capital. In 1883 the capital was moved to Sandakan to capitalise on its potential of vast timber resources. In 1888 North Borneo became a protectorate of the United Kingdom. Administration and control over North Borneo remained in the hands of the Company despite being a protectorate and they effectively ruled until 1942. Their rule had been generally peaceful except for some rebellions, including one led by the Suluk-Bajau leader Mat Salleh from 1894 to 1900, and another led by Antanum of the Muruts which is known as the Rundum resistance in 1915.

Philippine Claim
The Sultanate of Sulu was granted the north-eastern part of the territory as a prize for helping the Sultan of Brunei against his enemies and from then on that part of Borneo was recognized as part of the Sultan of Sulu's sovereignty. In 1878, Baron Von Overbeck, an Austrian partner representing The British North Borneo Company and his British partner Alfred Dent, leased the territory of Sabah. In return, the company was to provide arms to the Sultan to resist the Spaniards and 5,000 Malayan dollars annual rental based on the Mexican dollar's value at that time or its equivalent in gold. This lease was continued until the independence and formation of the Malaysian federation in 1963 together with Singapore, Sarawak and the states of Malaya. As of 2004, the Malaysian Embassy to the Philippines had been paying cession/rental money amounting to US$1,500 per year (about 6,300 Malaysian Ringgits) to the heirs of the Sultanate of Sulu.
The contract between Sri Paduka Maulana Al Sultan Mohammad Jamalul Alam, representing the sultanate as owner and sovereign of Sabah on one hand, and that of Gustavus Baron de Overbeck and Alfred Dent representing the North Borneo Company, on the other as lessees of Sabah, was executed on January 22, 1878. The Lease prohibits the transfer of Sabah to any nation, company or individual without the consent of His Majesty’s Government (“Government of the Sultan of Sulu”).[7] Although it is mentioned to be a permanent lease, it is contrary to international law, which states that the terms for a lease contract can only be for 99 years, as in the case of Hong Kong and Macau when these were leased to United Kingdom and Portugal respectively, by China and subsequently returned after the expiration of the lease. This would make the lease on Sabah overdue by 130 years.
Less than a decade later, the Sultanate of Sulu came under the control of Spain and in 1885, Spain relinquished all of its claim to Borneo to the British in the Madrid Protocol of 1885. In spite of that, in 1906 and 1920 the United States formally reminded United Kingdom that Sabah did not belong to them and was still part of the Sultanate of Sulu on the premise that Spain never acquired sovereignty over North Borneo to transfer all its claims of sovereignty over North Borneo to the United Kingdom on the Madrid Protocol of 1885. This is so because the Sultan of Sulu did not include his territory and dominion in North Borneo in signing the treaty of 1878 recognizing the Spanish sovereignty over “Jolo and its dependencies.” North Borneo was never considered a dependency of Jolo. However, the British Government ignored the reminder and still annexed the territory of North Borneo as a Crown Colony on July 10, 1946. This was in spite of the fact that the British Government was aware of the decision made by the High Court of North Borneo on December 19, 1939, that the successor of the Sultan in the territory of Sabah was the Government of the Philippine Islands and not United Kingdom.
On September 12, 1962, during President Diosdado Macapagal's administration, the territory of North Borneo, and the full sovereignty, title and dominion over the territory were ceded by the then reigning Sultan of Sulu, HM Sultan Muhammad Esmail E. Kiram I, to the Republic of the Philippines. The cession effectively gave the Philippine government the full authority to pursue their claim in international courts. The Philippines broke diplomatic relations with Malaysia after the federation had included Sabah in 1963. It was revoked in 1989 because succeeding Philippine administrations have placed the claim in the back burner in the interest of pursuing cordial economic and security relations with Kuala Lumpur.
The western part of Sabah is generally mountainous, containing the three highest mountains in Malaysia. The most prominent range is the Crocker Range which houses several mountains of varying height from about 1,000 metres to 4,000 metres. At the height of 4,095 metres, Mount Kinabalu is the highest mountain in Malaysia and the mountain is the fourth tallest in Southeast Asia behind Hkakabo Razi of Myanmar (5881 m), Puncak Jaya (4884 m) and Puncak Trikora (4750 m) of Papua, Indonesia . The jungles of Sabah are classified as rainforests and host a diverse array of plant and animal species. Kinabalu National Park was inscribed as a World Heritage Site in 2000 because of its richness in plant diversity combined with its unique geological, topographical, and climatic conditions.
Lying nearby Mount Kinabalu is Mount Tambuyukon. At a height of 2,579 metres, it is the third highest peak in the country. Adjacent to the Crocker Range is the Trus Madi Range which houses the second highest peak in the country, Mount Trus Madi, at a height of 2,642 metres. There are lower ranges of hills extending towards the western coasts, southern plains, and the interior or central part of Sabah. These mountains and hills are traversed by an extensive network of river valleys and are in most cases covered with dense rainforest.
The central and eastern portion of Sabah are generally lower mountain ranges and plains with occasional hills. Kinabatangan River begins from the western ranges and snakes its way through the central region towards the east coast out into the Sulu Sea. It is the second longest river in Malaysia after Rejang River at a length of 560 kilometres. The forests surrounding the river valley also contains an array of wildlife habitats, and is the largest forest-covered floodplain in Malaysia.
The northern tip of Borneo at Tanjung Simpang Mengayau
Other important wildlife regions in Sabah include Maliau Basin, Danum Valley, Tabin, Imbak Canyon and Sepilok. These places are either designated as national parks, wildlife reserves, virgin jungle reserves, or protection forest reserve.
Over three quarters of the human population inhabit the coastal plains. Major towns and urban centers have sprouted along the coasts of Sabah. The interior region remains sparsely populated with only villages, and the occasional small towns or townships.
Beyond the coasts of Sabah lie a number of islands and coral reefs, including the largest island in Malaysia, Pulau Banggi. Other large islands include, Pulau Jambongan, Pulau Balambangan, Pulau Timbun Mata, Pulau Bumbun, and Pulau Sebatik. Other popular islands mainly for tourism are, Pulau Sipadan, Pulau Selingan, Pulau Gaya, Pulau Tiga, and Pulau Layang-Layang.
The western part of Sabah is generally mountainous, containing the three highest mountains in Malaysia. The most prominent range is the Crocker Range which houses several mountains of varying height from about 1,000 metres to 4,000 metres. At the height of 4,095 metres, Mount Kinabalu is the highest mountain in Malaysia and the mountain is the fourth tallest in Southeast Asia behind Hkakabo Razi of Myanmar (5881 m), Puncak Jaya (4884 m) and Puncak Trikora (4750 m) of Papua, Indonesia . The jungles of Sabah are classified as rainforests and host a diverse array of plant and animal species. Kinabalu National Park was inscribed as a World Heritage Site in 2000 because of its richness in plant diversity combined with its unique geological, topographical, and climatic conditions.
Lying nearby Mount Kinabalu is Mount Tambuyukon. At a height of 2,579 metres, it is the third highest peak in the country. Adjacent to the Crocker Range is the Trus Madi Range which houses the second highest peak in the country, Mount Trus Madi, at a height of 2,642 metres. There are lower ranges of hills extending towards the western coasts, southern plains, and the interior or central part of Sabah. These mountains and hills are traversed by an extensive network of river valleys and are in most cases covered with dense rainforest.
The central and eastern portion of Sabah are generally lower mountain ranges and plains with occasional hills. Kinabatangan River begins from the western ranges and snakes its way through the central region towards the east coast out into the Sulu Sea. It is the second longest river in Malaysia after Rejang River at a length of 560 kilometres. The forests surrounding the river valley also contains an array of wildlife habitats, and is the largest forest-covered floodplain in Malaysia.
The northern tip of Borneo at Tanjung Simpang Mengayau
Other important wildlife regions in Sabah include Maliau Basin, Danum Valley, Tabin, Imbak Canyon and Sepilok. These places are either designated as national parks, wildlife reserves, virgin jungle reserves, or protection forest reserve.
Over three quarters of the human population inhabit the coastal plains. Major towns and urban centers have sprouted along the coasts of Sabah. The interior region remains sparsely populated with only villages, and the occasional small towns or townships.
Beyond the coasts of Sabah lie a number of islands and coral reefs, including the largest island in Malaysia, Pulau Banggi. Other large islands include, Pulau Jambongan, Pulau Balambangan, Pulau Timbun Mata, Pulau Bumbun, and Pulau Sebatik. Other popular islands mainly for tourism are, Pulau Sipadan, Pulau Selingan, Pulau Gaya, Pulau Tiga, and Pulau Layang-Layang.
[edit] Chief Ministers of Sabah
Year Chief Minister Party
1963-1964 Tun Fuad Stephens
United National Kadazan Organization (UNKO)
1965-1967 Datuk Peter Lo Sui Yin
Sabah Chinese Association (SCA)
1967-1975 Tun Mustapha Datu Harun
United Sabah National Organization (USNO) - BN
1975-1976 Tun Said Keruak
USNO - BN
1976 (44 days) Tun Fuad Stephens
Berjaya - BN
1976-1985 Datuk Harris Mohd Salleh
Berjaya - BN
1985-1994 Datuk Seri Joseph Pairin Kitingan
PBS - Opposition (In partnership with BN in 1986-1990)
1994-1995 Tun Sakaran Dandai
UMNO - BN
1995-1996 Datuk Salleh Tun Said Keruak
UMNO - BN
1996-1998 Datuk Yong Teck Lee
SAPP - BN
1998-1999 Tan Sri Bernard Dompok (now UPKO) Parti Demokratik Sabah (PDS) - BN
1999-2001 Datuk Seri Osu Haji Sukam
UMNO - BN
2001-2003 Tan Sri Chong Kah Kiat
LDP - BN
2003-present Datuk Seri Musa Aman
UMNO - BN

Demographics
The population of Sabah was 2,449,389 in 2000 and was the third most populous state in Malaysia after Selangor and Johor. It is estimated that Sabah's population has exceeded that of Johor with an estimated population of 3,400,000 in 2007. Sabah indeed has one of the highest population growth rates in the country.
• Kadazan-Dusun: 17.8%
• Rungus
• Bajau: 13.4%
• Malay: 11.5%
• Murut: 3.3%
• Other bumiputra: 14.6%
• Chinese: 13.2%
• Other non-bumiputra: 4.8%
• Non-Malaysian citizen: 25%
Ethnicities and Religion
Statistics of religion by state are not provided by the Department of Statistics Malaysia. Sabah has one of the highest populations of Christians (Roman Catholic and Protestant) living in Malaysia but this proportion is believed to have fallen due to Muslim immigration from Malaya and Indonesia. Religious breakdown (2000): Islam 63.7%, Christianity 27.8%, Buddhism 12%, No Religion 1.0%, Taoism/Confucianism 0.4%, Others 0.3%, Hinduism 0.1%, Unknown 0.3%.
The people of Sabah are divided into 32 officially recognised ethnic groups. The largest immigrant ethnic group is the Chinese. Most Chinese people in Sabah are concentrated primarily at Kota Kinabalu, Sandakan, and Tawau. Kota Kinabalu has the highest concentration of Chinese people in Sabah, followed by Sandakan (second highest) and Tawau (third highest). The largest indigenous ethnic group is Kadazan-Dusun, followed by Bajau, and Murut. There is a very small number and proportion of Indians and other South Asians in Sabah compared to other parts of Malaysia. Collectively, all persons coming from Sabah are known as Sabahans and identify themselves as such.
Malay is the national language spoken across ethnicities, although the spoken Sabahan dialect of Malay differs much in inflection and intonation from the West Malaysian version, having more similarity in pronunciation to Indonesian. English, Mandarin as well as Hakka and Cantonese are widely understood. In addition, Kadazan-Dusun, Bajau, Murut and other smaller groups also have distinct ethnic languages. Sabah also has its own unique Sabahan-slangs for many words in Malay.
The federal government of Malaysia officially recognizes 28 ethnic groups as being indigenous or bumiputra in Sabah:
• Kadazan-Dusun
• Malay
• Kwijau
• Murut
• Bajau
• Illanun
• Lotud
• Rungus
• Tambanuo
• Dumpas
• Mangka'ak
• Suluk
• Orang Sungai
• Brunei
• Kedayan
• Bisaya Beaufort
• Tidong
• Maragang
• Orang Cocos
• Paitan
• Ida'an
• Minokok
• Rumanau
• Chinese of mixed bumiputra parentage
Other inhabitants:
• Filipino
• Indonesians
• Sarawak indigenous groups
• Serani

Economy
Sabah's economy was traditionally heavily lumber dependent, based on export of tropical timber, but with increasing depletion of the natural forests and ecological efforts to save remaining natural rainforest areas, palm oil has emerged. Other agricultural products important in the Sabah economy include rubber and cacao. Tourism is currently the second largest contributor to the economy. There are other exports like seafood and vegetables.
In 1970, Sabah ranked as one of the richest states in the federation, with a per capita GDP second only to Selangor (which then included Kuala Lumpur). However, despite its vast wealth of natural resources, Sabah is currently the poorest of Malaysia's states. Average incomes are now among the lowest in Malaysia, and with a considerably higher cost of living than in West Malaysia. In 2000 Sabah had an unemployment rate of 5.6 per cent, the highest of any Malaysian state and almost twice the national average of 3.1 per cent. The state has the highest poverty level in the country at 16 per cent, more than three times the national average. Part of the problem is the inequitable distribution of wealth between state and federal governments, and large numbers of illegal immigrants from Indonesia, the Philippines, even East Timor, whose population was estimated to be in the region of half a million people. In 2004 the poverty level worsened to 22 per cent.
The recent tabling of the Ninth Malaysia Plan has allocated RM16.908 billion for Sabah, the second highest state allocation after Sarawak's but it is still only 8% of the total national budget for a population of Sabah of more than 13%, and an area of more than 25%. This is clearly discriminatory and has contributed to the State of Sabah having the largest number of people below the poverty line in Malaysia, and lower than the Indonesian national poverty rate and in the same level as Aceh and Myanmar based on 2004 United Nations figures.
The fund is pledged to improve the state's rural areas, improve the state's transportation and utilities infrastructures, and boost the economy of Sabah. The government has placed its focus on three major areas of the economy which have the potential to be Sabah's growth engine. These are agriculture, manufacturing and tourism.
When this discriminatory budget against Sabah and Sarawak was pointed out, the allocation for Sabah was increased from the earlier figure of 15.7 billion RM while there is none for Sarawak. The reason given to Sarawak's Chief Minister, as reported by Borneo Post (11 November 2007) is that it is not economical to develop Sarawak. Sarawak is to be the source of renewable resources for Malaya. This situation applies to Sabah as well except that Sarawak's renewable resources are not even meant for Sabah. The percentage of the total budget is still much less than Sabah's population and area burdens, and this is a classic example of too little and too late.
Urban centers and ports
There are currently 7 ports in Sabah: Kota Kinabalu Port, Sepanggar Bay Container Port, Sandakan Port, Tawau Port, Kudat Port, Kunak Port, and Lahad Datu Port. These ports are operated and maintained by Sabah Ports Authority. The major towns and city are:


Rank City Population
1 Kota Kinabalu
532,129
2 Sandakan
448,074
3 Tawau
349,962
4 Lahad Datu
119,938
5 Keningau
97,152
6 Semporna
71,157
7 Kudat
34,481
Tourism
Tourism, particularly eco-tourism, is a major contributor to the economy of Sabah. In 2006, 2,000,000 tourists visited Sabah and it is estimated that the number will continue to rise following vigorous promotional activities by the state and national tourism boards and also increased stability and security in the region. Sabah currently has six national parks. One of these, the Kinabalu National Park, was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2000. It is the first of two sites in Malaysia to obtain this status, the other being the Gunung Mulu National Park in Sarawak. These parks are maintained and controlled by Sabah Parks under the Parks Enactment 1984. The Sabah Wildlife Department also has conservation, utilization, and management responsibilities.
National Parks
• Mount Kinabalu National Park - the second highest mountain in Southeast Asia with an altitude of 4,101 metres (13,455 ft). It is only lower than Puncak Jaya in Irian Jaya on the island of New Guinea, Indonesia at 4,884 metres.
• Turtle Islands Park - conservation efforts for endangered sea turtles
• Tunku Abdul Rahman Park - A national park consisting of five islands off the coast of Kota Kinabalu
• Pulau Tiga National Park
• Crocker Range National Park
• Tawau Hills Park
Notable Sabahans
Politics and governance
Mat Salleh was a Suluk-Bajau who led a rebellion against British North Borneo Company administration in North Borneo. Under his leadership, the rebellion which lasted from 1894 to 1900 razed the British Administration Centre on Pulau Gaya and exercised control over Menggatal, Inanam, Ranau and Tambunan. The rebellion was by Bajaus, Dusuns and Muruts.
Another notable Sabahan is Donald Stephens who helped form the state of Sabah under the UN appointed Cobbold commission. He was an initial opponent of Malaysia but was persuaded by Lee Kuan Yew with an offer of 8 university places for Sabahan students at the University of Malaya, Singapore
Donald Stephens was the first Huguan Siou or paramount leader of the Kadazan-dusun and Murut people.
Tun Datu Mustapha was a Suluk-Kagayan Muslim political leader in Sabah through the United Sabah National Organisation (USNO) party. He was a vocal supporter of Malaysia but fell out of favor with Malayan leaders despite forming UMNO branches in Saba and deregistering USNO. Efforts to reregister USNO have not been allowed, unlike UMNO that was allowed to be reregistered under the same name.
Former Chief Minister Joseph Pairin Kitingan is the current Huguan Siou and the President of Parti Bersatu Sabah (PBS). Pairin, the longest serving chief minister of the state and one of the first Kadazandusun lawyers, was known for his defiance of the federal government in the 1980s and 90s in promoting the rights of Sabah and speaking out against the illegal immigrant problems. Sabah was at the time one of only two states with opposition governments in power, the other being Kelantan. PBS has since rejoined BN and Datuk Pairin is currently the Deputy Chief Minister of Sabah.
The 8th and current Attorney General of Malaysia, Abdul Gani Patail, comes from Sabah.
In 2006, Penampang-born Richard Malanjum was appointed Chief Judge of Sabah and Sarawak and became the first Kadazandusun to hold such a post.
Arts
Sabah has produced a fair number of well-known media figures. With the advent of reality TV in Malaysia, Sabah produced more breakthrough artist compared to 4 decades before.
• Movies & TV: Tony Francis Gitom (filmmaker), Daphne Iking (NTV7 host), Farid Amirul Hisham (actor : 'Gerak Khas', Lim), Kamaruddin Mape (TV3 Newscaster), Farish Aziz (Astro TV host), actress Fung Bo Bo & Chung Shuk Wai
• Radio Disc Jockey: Maryanne Raymond (a.k.a. DJ Mary of TraxxFm), Constantine Anthony(a.k.a. DJ Constantine of TraxxFm), Shahrizan Ferouz(a.k.a. DJ The Shaz of TraxxFm), Fadhil bin Luqman (a.k.a. DJ Fad Da Dillio on TraxxFm), DJ Johnboy Lee of Hitz. FM & Bigfish Radio, DJ othoe (Suria.FM)
• 1st Sabahan Online Radio: (Sabahan.FM) DJ AbgLang, DJ KiNaBaLu, DJ si_jason, DJ Black, DJ Saliparjipun, DJ Iter, DJ markiekadus, DJ sumandak, DJ ayustitch, DJ lordYork, DJ Langau (http://www.sabahan.net/ http://sabahan.FM/listen.pls)
• Modelling: Guess model Amber Chia
• Musicians & Composers: Guitarist Roger Wang, composer Julfekar and Asmin Mudin
• Singers: Nazrey Johani (ex- nasyid group Raihan), Azharina Azhar, Winner of the Evergreen Singer Award Peter Dicky Lee, Pete Teo, Jerome Kugan, Mia Palencia, Yan Qing, Gary Cao, Dyg Noraini Hj. Shaari (Sinaran Pasport Kegemilangan Winner)
• Band & Groups: JIAJA (Blast Off! Season 2 Champion), E-Voke (Gang Starz 1), One Nation Emcees (Gang Starz Season 2 Winner), B.A.D. Boys (Adam's artists), Lotter & Divine Masters, Richael Gimbang of Estranged
• Reality TV stars (non-finalist): Nikki Palikat (Malaysian Idol), Mas (AF2), Yazer (AF3), Nora (AF4), Farha (AF5), Noni (AF5), Rubisa (AF7), Zizi (AF7), AB (OIAM2), Mark Malim (OIAM2), Shone (OIAM2)
Sports
Matlan Marjan is a former football player for Malaysia. He scored two goals against England in an international friendly on June 12, 1991. The English team included Stuart Pearce, David Batty, David Platt, Nigel Clough, Gary Lineker, was captained by Bryan Robson and coached by Bobby Robson. No other Malaysian player managed to achieve thisIn 1995, he along with six other Sabah players, were arrested on suspicion of match-fixing. Although the charges were dropped, he was prevented from playing professional football and was banished to another district. He was punished under the Internal Security Act (which allows for indefinite detention without any trial, despite being proven innocent, and even on non-security related issues).
Business
Arts and entertainment
Sabahan contestants attained many finalist spots and even won major reality TV show contests. This phenomenon is probably due to many hidden Sabahan talents finally uncovered through Reality TV.
• One in a Million: Ayu (OIAM2 winner), Esther (1st runner-up OIAM3)
• Akademi Fantasia finalist: Norlinda Nanuwil & Adam from AF2, Felix Agus & Marsha Milan Londoh from AF3, Velvet & Lotter from AF4, Candy & Ebi from AF5, Stacy the AF6/1st Sabahan/2nd female champion
• Gang Starz: E-Voke (season 1 semi-finalist), One Nation Emcees (season 2 winner)
• Blast-Off: Jiaja (season 2 winner)
• Mentor: Pija (winner season 1), Fiq (winner season 2)

Sabah's first homegrown film was Orang Kita, starring Abu Bakar Ellah.
Some films and TV shows filmed in Sabah include the first season of reality show Survivor, The Amazing Race, Eco-Challenge Borneo, films Bat*21, as well as a number of Hong Kong production films. Sabah was also featured in Sacred Planet, a documentary hosted by Robert Redford.

There are many types of traditional dances in Sabah, most notably:
• Daling-daling: Danced by Suluks and Bajaus. In its original form, it was a dance which combined Arabic belly dancing and the Indian dances common in this region, complete with long artificial finger nails and golden head gear accompanied by a Suluk song called daling-daling which is a love story. Its main characteristic is the large hip and breast swings but nowadays it is danced with a faster tempo but less swings, called Igal-igal.
• Sumazau: Kadazandusun traditional dance which performed during weddings and Kaamatan festival. The dance form is akin to a couple of birds flying together.
• Magunatip: Famously known as the Bamboo dance, requires highly skilled dancers to perform. Native dance of the Muruts, but can also be found in different forms and names in South East Asia.

Sabah's first established newspaper was the New Sabah Times. The newspaper was founded by Tun Fuad Stephens, who later became the first Chief Minister of Sabah.
American author Agnes Newton Keith lived in Sandakan between 1934-1952 and wrote several books about Sabah.
In the Earl Mac Rauch novelization of Buckaroo Banzai (Pocket Books, 1984; repr. 2001), and in the DVD commentary, Buckaroo's archenemy Hanoi Xan is said to have his secret base in Sabah, in a "relic city of caves."

Philippines’ Real Area of Territory






Philippines’ sovereignty is not only limited to its current geographical area assigned by the international geographers and the United Nations. The boundary of the country which we presently known is short, narrow stretch line that extends from the tip of Batanes Group of Islands down south to Tawi-tawi has been shaped by history caused by a historical event in the past, demarcated by geographers and formalized and signed into papers by the United Nations. What we don’t know is that the Philippines is a country of large boundary oozing with diverse nature, one of the Earth’s most spectacular exotic places. The real boundary of the Philippines stretches from the Kalayaan group of islands (aptly called “Spratly’s Islands”) to the vast area of Sabah.
Sabah, in Borneo, southwest of the Philippines, is just being rented by Sultan Kiram of the Kingdom of Sulu, Philippines to the sultan of Malaysia in the 12th - 13th century. Since then, the negligence made Malaysia forget to return Sabah to its rightful owner, the Sulu archipelago. On the other hand, Kalayaan group of islands (commonly known as the Spratly’s Islands) was discovered by Tomas Cabili, a merchant from Bohol in the 1950s and was a part of the Philippines in the ancient times partly because of the Philippines’ close perimeter to these islands that makes it an easy habitat or dwellings for our ancestors.
Malaysia has the obligatory and compulsory task of returning Sabah to the Philippine government if it will be mandated by the Philippine law, at the same time, China and other countries that mockingly lay claim to the Spratlys should stop their mockery and larceny that will make them liable and indicted for felony. They have, in no way, rights to claim in these islands which is rightfully owned by the Philippines if mandated by the Philippine law and constitution and consigned by the United Nations.
Kalayaan Islands or the Spratlys are geographically & historically significant to Philippine sovereignty while China and other countries only have the idea of colonialism & imperialism. China, however, should not be enraged over the Philippines’ lawful territorial claims but have an open mind, deep knowledge, rational & logical thinking, and don’t let greed, selfishness and pride dominate and rule them that will lead them to public consternation around the world but have a great humility and sincere, deep concern over its neighboring country. Don’t let this happen like what China deals with Taiwan and Tibet because it will only humiliate their respective countries to the global community.
This is just my personal conviction not just for the Philippines but for impartial, logical thinking and rational judgment while we are not meddling with China and other countries in their state affairs nor interfering or hindering their exploits and disputes for other territories and boundaries, so shall they stop meddling and hindering our rightful claims to these islands.

Hail To The Queen Of Democracy and the Philippines,





The mother of democracy, Corazon “Cory” Cojuangco Aquino who lost her battle against colon cancer and died of cardio-pulmonary arrest last August 1 had survived nine coup attempts and fought valiantly against dictatorship to restore democracy. Triggered by the assassination of her husband, Sen. Benigno S. Aquino Jr., a known to be a vocal critic of Marcos dictatorship, in 1983, she fearlessly ran for the highest position in the land clashing against the mighty Ferdinand Marcos in the 1986 snap election in an attempt to officially declare the legitimate leader, however, the results were conflicting. Namfrel (short for National Movement for Free Elections), an independent counting body lawfully permitted to have their own version of ballot counting, declared Corazon C. Aquino, a plain housewife and widow of Sen. Benigno S. Aquino Jr., as the legitimate winner, on the other hand, the more legitimate state-run Commission on Elections (COMELEC) officially declared Ferdinand E. Marcos as the winner. NAMFREL accused COMELEC of rigging the results favoring the stoic, fearsome Marcos but the COMELEC was unfazed of the accusation formally declaring the current president which results to the mass resignation of NAMFREL’s poll officials. This stirring swift event fueled burning sentiments, sympathy and sense of nationalism of people calling them to bring the silent, bloodless protest to the street of what is now respected worldwide “People Power” to dethrone the abusive dictator. Could you imagine a plain housewife overthrowing a terrifying dictator? She is fearless, courageous woman that inspires the world over from China to Romania to Latin America for a bloodless silent protest. Once Marcos is exiled in Hawaii, she has the daunting task of restoring democracy and freedom to the country and people who for more than a decade suffered the slavery of Marcos dictatorship. She gained the respect, admiration, trust and support of the Filipino people due to her austerity and humility. She survived nine coup attempts of disdainful military leaders with courage, affirmed faith. On one instance, she is happily cooking in the kitchen even if there is a rising mutiny of the military outside the palace with lots of military tanks and powerful weapons. She is resolute and firm on her principles, fair and rational on her judgment and openness for choice for the people, in fact, she must be an inspiration for Russia’s Mikhail Gorbachev to brainchild the glasnost and perestroika. The embattled mother for Filipino masses is an epitome of a woman who struggle and persevere against all odds in the most difficult and trying times of her life. With her indomitable faith in God, she is a titan in a guise of a woman. She has an ocean of love and concern for her country and the Filipino people. With Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” S. Aquino Jr. benediction, she fulfilled the sweet fate of democracy to the Philippines.
Although nominating her into sainthood is almost an impossibility, her simple acts of holiness are already enough for her to merit a saintly accord by the Filipinos. She received numerous awards and citations due to her achievements and accomplishments in transforming a new stronger and free Philippines, restoring the faith of the people and gaining respect and accolade of the global community but the highest award we can bestow the couple is that we exemplify and emulate their shining character in our daily lives, appreciate their struggles and sacrifices by reminding ourselves to do our own share, even in the smallest ways for our country like exercise your right to suffrage and helping conserve the mother nature because this is the only way to repay the things we greatly owe to them. It is because of Sen. Benigno “Ninoy” S. Aquino Jr. that we are awaken from deep slumber of apathy, indifference and vulnerability to have strength and fortitude to fight for freedom and democracy. It is because of Corazon “Cory” C. Aquino that we are freed from the grim slavery of dictatorship and abuse and opened the way to our rights and privileges that we are enjoying today. She is a fortress standing against earthquakes and storms of a powerful regime attested and been tried to topple yet powerfully standing that people can lean on.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

We want a composer for this Song!

"The time has come throughout the world in every land

To speak of more than what is bland

of things quite new but ever true

of skies once hazy, again bright and blue



Of persons risen up who've overcome

above and underneath the sun

above and underneath the sun

the muck and goo of city's slum

.



to be continued...

Strong Vaccine for A(H1N1) Virus

In addition to the helpful advice given it will prove helpful to add that there have been recommendations given for people to cough in their elbow crease/ the inner arm elbow joint, rather than in their hands, to prevent contaminating the hands and then thereafter unwittingly touching such other things others will come in contact with. Even mail box handles, door knobs and elevator button can retain virus infectives.

Additionally, though not yet widely published, there are also known ways to safely impede viral proliferation when once contracted. We've safely used such non-injectible items numerous times, and always with welcomed results forthcoming in less than a 24 hour period.
We are willing to provide such items in dry form until being able to provide bottled solutions or boxed contents for hand sanitizers, sprays and beverage teas.

While not all such materials are not inexpensive, sufficient quantities can be made using the dry ingredients that will last for months; since there is minimal deterioration resulting from storage. There are no counter-indications/adverse side effects from such usages as long as instructions are carefully followed.

Once we have about a million responses we should then be able to gear up for mass production after all other legalities have been appropriately attended to and assumed. An additional web site is under construction. Persons in other countries should make contact as soon as possible, since shipping may delay reception. It is best to have the ingredients on hand in advance. We are not manufacturers and so currently we need only receive evidences of interest. Once adequate responses have been noted and offers to assist with manufacturing and shipping costs etc in civil joint venture collaborative manner, then measures can be taken to more rapidly handle interests requests.

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume

1.Bahamas
2.Bolivia
3.China
4.Curacao
5.Dominican Republic
6.Ecuador
7.Egypt
8.El Salvador
9.France
10.Germany
11.Guyana
12.Indonesia
13.Japan
14.Mexico
15.Namibia
16.Netherlands
17.Nicaragua
18.Nigeria
19.Panama
20.Peru
21.Singapore
22.Slovenia
23.South Africa
24.Spain
25.Thailand
26.Turks & Caicos
27.Venezuela
28.Zambia

Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part VI



Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part V





Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part IV





Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part III





Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part II





Miss Universe 2009: Best In National Costume Part I





Thursday, September 3, 2009

Eating Broccoli Can Prevent You from Mosquito Bite?

With m osquito's still around,
Some one mention to me that eatingf broccoli can repell mosquito's. I'd also add eating asparagras or even garlic. Garlic may also keep your enemies and friends too at a safe distance :o} Try it. Cabbage may work too sometimes, especially raw (but be sure to chew it thoroughly first before swallowing).

How To Overcome Debts

Many people confuse debt with value, because debt involves an amount, a quantity. Therefore persons who have difficulty making distinctions between what includes something similar, may actually consider them to be the same. It's like not being able to distinguish different tones or some colors or even some species of birds, plants, trees or flowers from others, and so just lump them all under a single type. Thus the saying "A rose is a rose" as though all are the same.

Therefore in addition to often being 'pressed against a wall' such persons typically lack judgment and discernment and will easily become ensnared by credit card offers and promotions because to them what is being offered is an 'amount' not a long term debt. They're not inclined to seek out details in anything or read the small print "Don't bother me with the details" types. What is on the surface -the appearance of things- is all that counts. Such kind of narrow-mindedness is also seen in official places throughout the world as well..

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Many people confuse debt with value, because debt involves an amount, a quantity. Therefore persons who have difficulty making distinctions between what includes something similar, may actually consider them to be the same. It's like not being able to distinguish different tones or colors or even species of plants, trees or flowers and so just lump them all under a single type. Thus the saying "A rose is a rose" as though all are the same.

Therefore in addition to often being 'pressed against a wall' such persons typically lack judgment and discernment and will easily become ensnared by credit card offers and promotions because to them what is being offered is an 'amount' not a long term debt. They're not inclined to seek out details in anything or read the small print "Don't bother me with the details" types. What is on the surface -the appearance of things-is all that counts. Such kind of thinking is also seen in official places throughout the world as well where some leaders think all they need is more money.

Pics Of The Foreign Tourist I Hosted



Classic Pics Part 4




Classic Pics Part 3